Wednesday, 23 December 2015

Sorry no more blog .....

Hi all of my blog readers

I'm really sorry to announce that the 'Dunfermline News 100 Years Ago' blog is stopping with immediate effect.

I discovered today that I am no longer able to write and publish my blog in the only hour I had available to do so and therefore I have decided to stop writing this blog.

(If by some miracle I discover an extra hour in the week in the future I will resume blogging).

I would also like to say that I am extremely grateful for the more than 2300 views of my blog since I launched it at the end of May 2015!

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year for 2016 when it comes!

If I can help you with family history research, please contact me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com

Thanks again.

Jacqueline Hunter, 23 December 2015.

Thursday, 17 December 2015

80th birthday celebrations of Dunfermline's most famous son


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 18 December 1915 issue)

Welcome to the new blog post from Dunfermline News 100 years Ago.  Sorry there was no blog post last week, my personal life intervened but I'm back on schedule now!

Dunfermline's most famous son is of course Andrew Carnegie who was 80 this week 100 years ago and the following report appeared in the local paper:

Mr Carnegie The 80th Birthday Celebrations

The "Scottish American" in its account of the celebration of the 80th birthday of Mr Carnegie describes the octogenarian as in excellent health.  It notices the fact that in exemplification of his frequently expressed principle, that it is a disgrace for a man to die rich, he has distributed 324,657,300 dollars.  It adds - "He is even declared to be no longer wealthy though his present wealth is placed at 20,000,000 dollars which to many men would be wealth even beyond the dreams of avarice but which means to him that for every twenty dollars he has earned he has given away about eighteen or nineteen.  What man who ever lived has done more than that? 

But to turn from moralising to the day just celebrated at the ironmaster's palace at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Ninety-first Street, there was a constant stream of messenger boys delivering felicitations and hopes for many a return of the auspicious day.  Many called to leave their congratulations in person and not a few of those were greeted by the smiling hearty octogenarian the Laird of Skibo. He had started the day with his usual game of Clock Golf in the great yard at the rear of his house and was in fine fettle. 

In the afternoon when the throng of friends in the library had become great he appeared at the head of the grand staircase and listened to the singing by members of the Oratorio Society of which he has been president for 27 years of Beethoven's hymns "Ode to Joy" which was followed by one of his favourite Scottish airs "The Piper of Dundee".  He was much affected, remarking that the music was "almost too heavenly to be of this earth". 

Message of congratulations came to Mr Carnegie from all over the world.  There were more than a thousand telegrams and cablegrams besides a bushel of letters.  He later had dinner with Mrs Carnegie and his daughter and Mr and Mrs George Lauder of Pittsburg. 

With such evidence of universal affection Mr Carnegie can certainly regard his life as having been well spent and appreciated and can cheerily face the future and receive strength to live to the centenary mark - his present ambition.  That he may be spared to see the century mark will be the hope ? of all his friends for the good he can yet do and have done.  In that time he may have some of his great ambitions brought near realisation: first the ratio he has already given practical illustration of in regard to personal wealth; second that there will be a sure establishment of universal peace; and with the accomplishment of those the third and consequent of these the arrival of time when:

"Man to man the world o'er shall brothers be for a' that."

Such indeed are the cardinal foundational principles of that universal human welfare which Andrew Carnegie has done so much to advance and make possible.  May he live to be a hundred and more to see their fruition."



Unfortunately Andrew Carnegie did not manage his centenary and died in 1919!

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 4 December 2015

Carnock Road Accident and Bowhill Call to Ministry


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 4 December 1915 issue)

Welcome all to my new blog post focusing on social history in Dunfermline 100 years ago!

Road Accident - Carnock Man Killed by Motor Cycle

An incident occurred on the Dunfermline Carnock Road about three hundred yards to the east of Carnock village late on Saturday night.  While William Wyllie, underground manager, East Grange, was proceeding home to Dunfermline on his motor bicycle, accompanied in a side-car by his brother-in-law, William Lemels, the machine came into contact with a dark object lying on the road.  Wyllie was thrown from his machine and on investigation the obstacle was found to be the body of a man later identified as William Stevenson, a miner, fifty years of age, residing in Carnock,  The unfortunate man was badly injured about the head and one of his jaw bones was broken.  Death was instantaneous.  Stevenson is a married man but resided alone.



Bowhill - call to Rev Mr Conway

The Rev S M Conway pastor of Bowhill Baptist Church has received a unanimous call to the Baptist Church, Dumfries.  Mr Conway came from Dundee 6 years ago as successor to the Rev James Young who left for Manchester at that time.  The members of the Baptist Church opened a new place of worship in November 1907 2 years previous to Mr Conway taking up duty and there still remained a debt of £300 in 1909.  Largely due to the energies of Mr Conway this debt was cleared 2 years ago.  Mr Conway was also a member of the School Board and took a keen interest in public matters.

{Bowhill baptist church was demolished after 1988 and it's former site is now occupied by terraced housing at Derran Drive, Bowhill.]

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 27 November 2015

Bankrupt merchant and musical recital


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 20 November 1915 issue)

Welcome all to my new blog post focussing on social history in Dunfermline 100 years ago!

Dunfermline Merchants Bankrupt

In Dunfermline Sheriff  Court on Tuesday, Thomas Brown, sole partner of the firm of Hutchison and Brown, potato merchants, Grantsbank, Dunfermline was examined by Sherriff Umpherston in bankruptcy.

He lodged a statement of affairs and the usual oath was administered.  He stated that the military took possession of his stores, he had no adequate means of carrying on his business, less interest in and in consequence failed.  The statement lodged showed that book debts including a sum for army billets totalled £180.  The total assets were £363 less preferable claim for rent and taxes £35 leaving for division £225 5s 1d.  The liabilities cited consisting of trade debts amounted to £384 8s 5d showing a deficient of £95 2s 7d.

[The only building that now bears the name of Grantsbank in Dunfermline is a modern care home building].

Musical recital

A successful dramatic and musical recital was held  in the hall of the UF Abbey Church on Wednesday evening and resulted in a contribution of about £9 being made to the fund for providing comforts for local men at the front. The programme included solos by Misses Taylor, J Hendry, M Penman, W Knight recitations by Private G S Sandilands, 2-9th HLI and Mr Tom Walters; selections by the Canmore Orchestra (leader Mr H Watson), cello solo by Lance-Corporal H R Child and part songs by a choir.  Mr W Dickson acted as accompanist.  The entertainment was greatly enjoyed.




Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.








Friday, 20 November 2015

Fire in High Valleyfield and Death in Donibristle


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 20 November 1915 issue)

Welcome all to my new blog post focussing on social history in Dunfermline 100 years ago!

A property destroyed by fire in High Valleyfield

Early on Thursday morning fire broke out in the coal cellar of a house in Abbey Crescent, High Valleyfield.  The house was tenanted by John Philp.  The fie took a firm grip of the boxes and other material in the coal cellar and notwithstanding the efforts at extinguishing by means of pailfuls of water it obtained masonry and before it was put out Philp's house and another adjoining were totally gutted.  Most of the furniture was saved.  The damage is established at between £300 and £400.  It is believed that the fire originated from a piece of burning paper which a woman was using in order to enable her to collect some coal.  The property belonged to the Fife Coal Company.



Donibristle - the late Mr Beath

Widespread regret has been caused by the announcement of the death of Mr Robert Beath who conducted a licensed grocer's establishment in Donibristle for 35 years and who only retired from business 18 months ago.  Mr Beath took a keen interest in all public affairs and acted as Chairman of Aberdour School Board for several years.  He had also a long period of service on the Parish Council and was on both these bodies at his death.  He superintended the Sabbath school in Donibristle for nearly 30 years and would have celebrated his golden wedding in a fortnight.  Some years ago Mr Beath was elected a JP for the county and up till his last illness he took an active part all the patriotic associations.  He leaves a family of four sons and four daughters.  He was 71 years of age.


Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.


Friday, 13 November 2015

An accident and an assault .....


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 13 November 1915 issue)

Welcome to the second instalment of my exploration of the 13 November 1915 issue.
 
 The first article this week strikes me as very similar to what happens in the 21st century:

Tramway Accident Claim

 
In the Outer House of the Court of Session on Wednesday Lord Ormidale closed the record in an action at the instance of John Buchanan, Anchoria Cottage, Harrie Brae Park, Dunfermline against the Corporation of Glasgow for £250 damages in respect of personal injuries.  On Thursday 5th August 1913 the pursuer, who was on holiday in Glasgow, boarded one of the defender's tramway cars at the Merkland Street car station.  He was proceeding up the stair of the car, intending to take a seat on the upper platform when the car, he says, started suddenly and with such a violent jerk that, although he was grasping the stair rail with one hand, he was wrenched from his hold and thrown over the rail onto the street.  The defenders deny fault and explain that while in the course of ascending the stair the pursuer lost his balance and fell backwards onto the street.  They plead that the pursuer failed to take  what was a customary precaution in the circumstances - namely a secure hold of the handrail provided or the purpose of safeguarding passengers ascending the stir while the car was moving.  Issues were ordered for the trial of the action by jury.

[Harrie Brae Park is directly opposite where I live!].



Assault on a Warder

George Williams labourer was fined 7s 6d with the option of 5 days imprisonment for having assaulted Edward Meechan a warden in a Chapel Street common lodging house by  striking him with his fist on the face to his effusion of blood.  Accused said that Meechan had struck him on the head with a poker but the Prosecutor remarked there was no provocation.
 
 

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 6 November 2015

A Dunfermline divorce and pithead mischief


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 13 November 1915 issue)

Unfortunately the issue dated 6 November 1915 has not survived so instead I will explore the 13 November 1915 issue over 2 weeks.
 
A Dunfermline Divorce Case
 
On Saturday an action for divorce by Mrs Jack, 34 Rolland Street, Dunfermline came before Lord Anderson who granted her decree against her husband with the custody of the child in marriage.  The parties were married in June 1903.  They took up house at Wishaw and afterwards at Dunfermline.  Her husband was in a good position at Dunfermline and before the birth of the child his behaviour was all that could be desired.  Afterwards, however, he remained out at night and when the child was three and a half years old he began to talk about going abroad.  She was surprised as she knew no reason why he should leave the country.  He went away in February 1911 stating that he was going to New Zealand to better himself.  He also said he would make a home for her and her child.  After beig in New Zealand for about six months he went to Melbourne, Australia.  During the first 2 years he was away he never sent her anything for her support and after that he sent her £2 on 2 separate occasions.  Her minister wrote to her husband in October 1914 but got no reply.  She had written to her husband's employers in Melbuorne but no reply came back.  After the summons in the action had been served on the defender in April of this year she had received two letters from her husband.  He complained about her writing to his employers and said what was not true - that on two occasions he had sent her £5.  In one of the letters he said he was coming home on 25th April.  She had not heard from him nor in her knowledge had he come home.
 
 
 
Pithead Mischief
 
In Dunfermline Juvenile Court on Monday a Lumphinnans lad of 13 years of age admitted having on 25th inst on the red bing at No 1 Pit, Lumphinnans wantonly and maliciously caused two empty hutches to run down the hutch road in consequence of which one of them derailed and the other endangered another load and collided with hutches at the pithead.  He was put on probation for 4 months.  
 
[Some extra information! A hutch was a receptacle in which coals were conveyed from the pit face.  Production commenced at Lumphinnans No 1 pit in 1852 and it closed in 1957.  The average workforce was 182.  The peak workforce was 202 and the peak year was 1951]. 

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 30 October 2015

Thefts in Cowdenbeath and Rosyth


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 30 October 1915 issue)

Welcome to the next issue of Dunfermline 100 years ago.  I apologise for the lack of a blog post last week.  I had injured my shoulder and was giving it and the keyboard some much needed rest.

Anyway usual service will now resume ..............

Juvenile Offenders - Cowdenbeath Lad's Record

Sheriff Umpherston at Dunfermline on Monday had before him several lads for various offences - the most serious being theft by housebreaking.

James McDonagh (11) son of Stephen McDonagh, miner, 2 Mungal Street, Cowdenbeath admitted having (1) on 8th inst at the restaurant premises at 54 High Street, Cowdenbeath occupied by Guiseppi Ventura stolen 2s of money and at the premises ar Crosshill occupied by Galtine Campanile ice cream vendor, broken into the shop and stolen 20 packets of cigarettes and 3s of money; (2) on 13th inst at Foulford Farm stolen from a bothy an alarm clock (3) on 15th inst at the shop at 270 High Street, Cowdenbeath occupied by John Levine general dealer pretended to his daughter Diana Levine then in charge that he had been sent by her father and sister to get a woman's watch for a soldier who was waiting in the shop at 174 High Street also occupied by John Levine and thus induced Diana Levine to deliver to him a woman's watch which he appropriated to his own use and thus defrauded her of it and (4) on 18th inst at the premises at 264 High Street occupied by Millie Bolan licensed broker stole a purse.  He admitted a previous conviction for theft in 1913.

The lad's father who was present said that so far as he could learn his son was guilty of all the charges.

The sheriff - you know your boy has been in trouble before.  You have not been looking after him.

The parent replied that he had done his bit but the lad had got a little out of his control of late.  He (the son) was not responsible for all his actions.

The fiscal - he must be an enterprising youth at his age and should be properly guided.

The sheriff said he would send the boy to a school where he would be looked after and where he would not be able to get beyond control.

Albert Hopping (13) son of James Hopping timberman and Charles Lawrey (11) son of Frederick Lawrey labourer Wood Street Rosyth Village admitted having at Rosyth School (1) between 18th and 20th September broken into the school with intent to steal therefrom (2) between 25th and 27th September broken into the school and stolen 4 keys (3) between 2nd and 4th October broken into the school and stolen from a lockfast desk eightpence of money and (4) on 10th October broken into the school with intent to steal.

They were put on probation for 4 months.






Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 16 October 2015

Price of Victory - Local Casualties - West Fife Heroes


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 16 October 1915 issue)

 
It struck me on looking through the local newspaper 100 years ago that there were increasing numbers of war casualties and this is what I have decided to highlight this week.
 
 
 
Price of Victory - Local Casualties - West Fife Heroes
 
The Brothers Robertson - A Church Tribute
 
In St Margaret's UF Church on Sunday the Rev John Sanderson made sympathetic references to the death of Private James Robertson son of Mr John Robertson, Reid Street.  He pointed out that of five sons of Mr Robertson who were serving, 2 have been killed and another wounded.  Private Robertson he said was a member of the choir of St Margaret's Church.  He took a known interest in the work of the choir his place being seldom vacant either at the services or at practice.  At the close of the service the 'Dead March' in 'Saul' was played by the organist Mr Wm Davidson the congregation meantime upstanding as a mark of reverence for the brave dead.  
 
[St Margaret's United Free church opened in East Port, Dunfermline on 02 September 1827 with room for 970 people.  The church was demolished in 1981 to make way for a new headquarters of the Dunfermline Building Society.  The congregation had previously moved to a new church in the Touch area of Dunfermline in 1974 and the congregation of St Margarets, which is now part of the Church of Scotland, is still in that same building in Touch].
 
9th Black Watch Cricketer Wounded
 
Twelve Dunfermline men who enlisted in the 9th Black Watch together have suffered badly in the recent fighting.  Nine have been wounded as yet nothing has been heard of the 3 others since the battle took place.  Among the wounded is Private Robert Boyd the well-known Fife cricketer who appeared for many seasons with Fifeshire Club.  He is at present lying in a French Hospital with a severe shrapnel wound in the right breast.  His parents reside in Elgin Terrace.
 
Another member of the company is Private Peter Philip.  He is at present in Edinburgh Infirmary and has been wounded in the legs and shoulder.  After being wounded he had to crawl several miles to safety.
 
Private Henry Wilson of the same regiment who previous to the war resided in Nethertown is in an English hospital with a bullet wound in his hand. He was employed as a miner before enlisting.
 
Private Thomas MacDougall who enlisted at the same time is also in hospital slightly wounded.  He was a rubber worker and when he enlisted resided in Dickson Stret.
 
Private Adamson of Forth Street is another of the unfortunate twelve.  His wounds are also slight.

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

 

Friday, 9 October 2015

Harvest thanksgiving service, a funeral and races


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 9 October 1915 issue)


Cairneyhill
 
Harvest thanksgiving and flower service

The annual harvest thanksgiving and flower service was held in the church last Sunday.  The Rev William Forbes preached from the text 'Except a corn of wheat fall onto the ground and die it abideth alone'.  Suitable praise was led by the choir who also rendered several anthems.  There was a large congregation.  The gifts of flowers, fruit, eggs etc were afterwards sent to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital and have been gratefully  acknowledged by the matron.

William Forbes was an Aberdeen man who was minister at Cairneyhill from 1895 until he died in Cairneyhill in 1943.

This is Cairneyhill church:

 
 

Linekilns and Charlestown

Funeral of the late Mr James Bryce

The remains of Mr James Bryce late collector of customs at Greenock were interred in Rosyth churchyard on Monday.  The funeral was attended by many friends from Dunfermline and the villages of Limekilns and Charlestown.  Mr Bryce was a native of the district.  His father was beadle of Limekilns church.  The early service of the boy with his father in ringing the church bell led him to remember his old church connection and when the belfry became so decayed he generously defrayed the cost.  That was some years ago.  The name of the generous friend was not made known at the time for the reason that he shunned publicity of good deeds.  Mr Bryce began life in the Elgin Estates office and his training there served him well when he entered government service.  He was unmarried.

[There is a connection between these first 2 articles in that Cairneyhill church and Limekilns church are now a linked charge.  The Elgin estate is the large estate still belonging to the Bruce family with their house named Broomhall which still covers a large amount of ground to the south of Dunfermline].

Charlestown children entertained

Charlestown children had a joyful surprise on Friday.  They were given a half day and informed that through the generosity of Lady Davis, London who is at present residing in the Elgin Hotel sports were to be provided for them.  The weather was fortunately of the very best and the football ground presented an admired appearance.  Lieutenant Davis who is on board one of H M Ships and is a son of Lady Davis came ashore and directed operations.  He brought with him the ship's band who discoursed mused [?].  There were events for children of all ages and even adults had a share.  The amusement creating items included the familiar old game of shipping the donkey's tail.  The poor aniumal cleverly painted on canvas by the sailors had the tail pinned even in its eye.  Another laugh producing game was the practice of the shying booth - the persons shied at including of course Kaiser Bill, Clown Prince and Von Turpe.  Several of the men from the ship dressed in fancy costume further added to the hilarity of the sports.  The following are the principal results:
Boys race (under 3) - 1 A Roxburgh, 2 O Thomson, 3 D Wood
Boys race (over 3) - 1 George Horn, 2 George Sinclair, 3 William Edwards
Girls race (under 3) - 1 Alice Westcott, 2 Alice Wilson, 3 Ina Roxburgh
Girls race (over 3) - 1 Grace Ferguson, 2 Ethel Phillip, 3 Jane Baxter
Shipping the donkey's tail ladies - 1 Miss Swan, 2 Mrs MacDonald
Shipping the donkey's tail girls - 1 Lizzie Simpson, 2 J Mann
Ladies race (over 21) - 1 Miss Mill, 2 Mrs McDonald, 3 Mrs Talbot
Lemonade and biscuit race boys - 1 John Fotheringham, 2 George Sinclair, 3 William McGregor
Lemonade and biscuit race girls - 1 Ina Thomson, 2 Ella Wood, 3 Eileen McMann.



 
Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

 

Friday, 2 October 2015

Kelty - Moray Church and Concert for soldiers


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 2 October 1915 issue)

Kelty

The Call to Moray Church

At the meeting of Dunfermline and Kinross Presbytery held at Dunfermline on Tuesday, a call by the congregation of Kelty Moray church to Mr William Craig BD a probationer was sustained.  Two candidates besides Mr Craig were nominated but he was adopted by a clear majority.  Rev George Lake Crossgates said the call was signed by 237 members and 22 adherents.  That might seem rather small out of a congregation of 483 but he wished the Presbytery to remember that 60 young members were at present serving with the army.  Once the new minister was placed the work would go on prosperously and he did not think the Presbytery should hesitate about sustaining the call.  Mr Shorthouse Kelty said he was certain that the new minister would receive a hearty welcome from the congregation.  The call was a most unanimous one.  Mr Duff Kelty said Mr Craig was a young man and there would be great scope for his abilities.  He had no doubt that the future would be very bright. 

This is what was formerly known as Moray church:


Moray Church became a community centre in 1974 and is now known as the Moray Institute.


Concert to wounded soldiers

A highly sucessful concert was given to the wounded soldiers in hospital at Tillryie by the Kelty Junior Orchestra on Wednesday last under the conductorship of Mr Alex R Penman.  The other players who took part were:- 1st violins James Watson, Alex Downie and Alex Mill, 2nd violins Henry Wells and Andrew Galloway, Cello Andrew Forrester, Clarinet David Lawson, Cornet Robert Sneddon while Archibald Penman provided the accompaniments.  Mr A R Penman the conductor, who went through a long course of training in Edinburgh, contributed 2 solos which were much appreciated.  The whole proceedings were a great success and everyone present spent a very enjoyable evening.  Mr John Armstrong and Mr A Inglis, Kelty conveyed the artistes from Kelty to Tillyrie and back in their motor cars free of charge.

Tillyrie House is near Milnathort and was used as an auxiliary hospital during WW1.  The house was built around 1841 and is still standing.
 

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

 

Friday, 25 September 2015

Aberdour, Inverkeithing & Bonhill - falls, fever and a marriage


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 25 September 1915 issue)
Inverkeithing
Labourer knocked down on the railway
While walking alomg the railway between Inverkeithing station and Rosyth on Friday night James Convey labourer, Naval Base Mansions, Jamestown, was overtaken by an engine.  He was knocked down and sustained a wound to his leg and serious injury to his head.  He was attended to by Drs Gordon and Aitken and was conveyed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital. 
Fall into the harbour
On Saturday evening about 830 while David Stevens labourer, Naval Base Mansions, Jamestown was on his way home he accidentally walked into the harbour.  His cries were heard by Mr Henry Anderson vintner who along with John Nibble and John MacDonald went to his assistance.  A rope was procured and thrown to Stevens who failed to catch it.  MacDonald then went into the harbour, fastened the rope around the man's body and pulled him ashore.  Stevens was a little exhausted but recovered shortly afterwards and was none the worse of his immersion.  There is no fence at the harbour.  This is the second case of a man walking into the water within the last few weeks. 
Aberdour
There are a few cases of scarlet fever in the village at present all of them of a mild character.
End of holiday season
With the shortening day and lengthening night Aberdour is gradually returning to the state of quietness which prevails during the winter months.  The al fresco entertainers have departed and the spirnkling of visitors ? by the unusually mild weather to rmain is slowly dwindling.  The holiday season is now practicaly ended.
Bowhill
From battlefield to altar
On Saturday Gunner Hugh Lawrie RFA was married to Miss Euphemia Banks in the parish church by the Rev A M Houston.  The soldier came direct from the battlefield in France and left again on Wednesday.

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 18 September 2015

Marine Engineer's Impertinence to Naval Officers


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 18 September 1915 issue)

City Police Court - Friday - Before Baillie Kenny

Marine Engineer's Impertinence to Naval Officers

Thomas Finlay marine engineer late of the steam lighter 'Trephom' admitted having while on board the lighter which was lying alongside one of His Majesty's ships conducted himself in a disorderly manner and committed a breach of the peace.

Accused said he had provocation.  The motors broke down on the way from Glasgow and the ship was kept waiting till 5 o'clock at night before it could get away.  Their ship had to go round the whole of the Admiralty ships.  His ship went to the place where it usually drew up but the officer ordered the ship to  go round to the other side.

The prosecutor had a complaint from the King's Harbourmaster who reported the accused for using filthy, insulting and obscene language to two officers on board His Majesty's Ship.  The accused refused to give his mame when requested.  The lighter was being brought alongside the starboard side of the ship and the accused was told to go to the port side.  In view of the insults to the officers the King's Harbourmaster thought the case should be followed up.  Finlay afterwards absconded and was arrested in Dumbartonshire.  Accused said he did not abscond.  The King's Harbourmaster ordered him to be dismissed which was a very severe punishment when it was considered he had been 2 days in custody.

Baillie Kenny said the charge was a serious one.  It was a big mistake for a man to make under the circumstances and the use of filthy language was very demoralising to every person who heard the language.  The sentence would be a fine of £1 with the option of 10 days imprisonment.


   
Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 11 September 2015

Kelty Roll of Honour and News 160 Years Ago


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 11 September 1915 issue)

This week I have chosen 2 articles, 1 name-rich article and 1 article highlighting news from 160 years ago. (The current Dunfermline newspaper, the Dunfermline Press, has a column every week highlighting news from 100 years ago, 50 years ago and 25 years ago and I both enjoy reading the column and seeing if the journalists choose the same news from 100 years ago as I do in my blog!).

Kelty - Roll of Honour

The secretary of the British Order of Ancient Free Gardeners (Kelty branch) has a compiled a list of the members who have joined His Majesty's Forces since the war began.



The following is a list of the names and regiment to which each one is attached:

A and S Highlanders - John Hynd, George Martin, William Cook, George Turner, Alexander Cuthbert, Henry Hynd, William Fisher, James Shields, Sam Drummond, Robert Beveridge, James Beveridge, Archibald Duncan, Sam Robertson, Thomas Wood, William Hall, John Bruce, James Bruce, Willliam Boyd, Andrew Fotheringham, John Wallace, John Redmond.
Black Watch - David Peter, James Campbell, Thomas Duncan, R S Wood, John Hutton, John Croll, William Weir, James Ewing, Alexander Drummond, John Sharp, David Wallace, Robert Millar.
Scots Guards - Alex Dalrymple, Alexander Black, Thomas Smith, James Scott, John Campbell, James T Wood.
RAMC - Thos Hailstones, Wm Miller, Robert Dickson, Thos Lochin, Robert Buchan, Alex Moull, John Ford.
Gordon Highlanders - John Miller.
Cameron Highlanders - Robert Fotheringham, J A Allan.
HLI - William Pate
Scottish Horse - William McKillop
Fife and Forfar Yeomanry - John Newton, Thomas Boyd, David Dalrymple.
Royal Garrison Artillery - Alexander Rankine, David Dewar, John Bruce.
Army Service Corps - William Nicol, Walter Dalrymple.
Royal Scots - Arthur McCurley
Seaforth Highlanders - T F Crowe
Scottish Rifles - Thomas Jamieson, John McCurley
KOSB - George McFarlane
RFA - Joseph Johnstone, John Birrell, William Leach, James Drummond
MTASC - Alexander Clark, John Russell

Tis Sixty Years Since - from Dunfermline Journal September 1855

Military Barracks - We understand arrangements are  progress by which Government intend acquiring those extensive premises known as Baldridge Works for the purpose of having them converted into permanent barracks.  When this object is completed it will raise considerable animation in this locality and besides benefit the town by sending large sums of money into circulation.

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 4 September 2015

Damage caused by flooding


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 4 September 1915 issue)

This week I was rather spoiled for choice as there were quite a few interesting choices 100 years ago in Dunfermline but I have decided to focus on one story based in the village of Cairneyhill where I grew up.  In addition I run a one place study on the people and history of Cairneyhill.
 
Alleged damage by flooding
 
In Dunfermline small debt court on Tuesday John Drummond feuar Main Street, Cairneyhill sued Andrew McLaren 37 Marlborough Road, Cathcart, Glasgow for the sum of £10 in respect of damage caused to his property by flooding.  In his correspondence he states that defender and he are owners of adjoining property on the South side of Main Street, Cairneyhill.  There is a ditch partly on the east boundary of pursuer's property carrying the surface water from the main street.  The ditch after passing through pursuer's property turns to the west and enters the defender's property closely adjoining the east boundary of the pursuer's property.
 
For a few years past the defender has been in the habit of discharging sewage into the ditch where it passes through his property and at the south end of the ditch where it enters a pipe the ditch has become choked with sludge.  Although complaint has been made repeatedly  to the defender he made no attempt to clean it as it was his duty in any event to do.  In consequence of his failure flooding has occurred on 3 separate occasions with damage to the pursuer's property.
 
The first occasion was in December 1914 when the pipe leading the water from the ditch became choked and the water overflowed onto the pursuer's land.  The water was also dammed back into the public street and from there it flowed into the byre belonging to the pursuer doing considerable damage.  On 29th June 1915 there was a very heavy fall of rain and flooding again took place resulting in damage to the pursuer's land and also to his scullery which adjoins the byre.  On 15th August 1915 there was also heavy rain and the pursuer's byre and scullery were flooded and 10 young chickens drowned.  The loss and damage suffered by the pursuer in consequence of the flooding upon the failure of the defender to keep the ditch cleaned out is reasonably estimated at the sum of £10.
 
Mr David Connel said the defence was an absolute denial that the defender was responsible for the flooding of the property.  The flooding was caused entirely by the abnormally heavy rainfall on 29the June.  There was a terrific thunderstorm and no ditch in the country could withstand such a heavy rain.  He also asked for specification of the damage.  Mr R W Currie said it was difficult to specify the damage when a byre was filled with a foot of water for a day.  Mr Conel said the only effect would be that the byre would be a little cleaner the next day.
 
Mr Currie said he had no objection to Mr Connel visiting the place.  Some of the damage could be seen still although he believed it had been necessary to remove the chickens.  The scullery had also been flooded.  The sheriff said that in the circumstances too much specification could not be given.  Mr Currie asked if defender was the owner of the ditch as as it passed through his property and if he was liable to keep it clean.  The Sheriff - I think you are bound to say Mr Connel.  Mr Connel admitted that the ditch did belong to his client where it passed through the ground.  Proof was fixed for 25th October.

 
 

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 28 August 2015

On the High Street .............


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the 28 August 1915 issue) 


This week I thought I would look at some of the many adverts for shops and services available in Dunfermline exactly 100 years ago:

Fancy a cup of tea?



Special value in Teas
Good household blend 2/- per lb
Indian and Ceylon blend 2/4 per lb
Darjeeling blend 2/8 per lb
Pure China tea 3/- per lb
Visit our new and up-to-date premises for high-class goods.
John McLelland & Co, Maygate, Telephone no 87

Visiting someone?  Why not take them a nice bouquet?

Beveridge's

23 Bridge Street & 12 Guildhall Street
For
Finest fruits, flowers & confections
Orders by 'phone punctually attended to
'Phone 162

Have toothache?

Kimmet & MacLean Ltd
Dental rooms
New address - 92 High Street, Dunfermline
Branches - Cowdenbeath, Kinross, Lochgelly, Inverkeithing, Limekilns
Painless Extractions - 1/-

Need a piano to practice on?

Pianos, organs etc
Large stock of splendid, second-hand, all guaranteed 10 years
Note address - Whyte & Co, pianoforte saloon, Dunfermline and Inverkeithing


Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 21 August 2015

Death caused by shell shock?


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend

(Unfortunately the Saturday August 14 and 21 1915 issues have not survived so I will stick to the Saturday August 7 1915 issue for 1 more week):

Death of a Kingseat Scots Guardsman

A verdict of suicide while of unsound mind was returned at a St Pancras, London inquest on Saturday regarding the death of Alexander Sharpe 37 a private in the 3rd (reserve) battalion of the Scots Guards whose home was stated to be at Kingseat, Dunfermline and who was found dying in an express train from Edinburgh.

Mary Rose Sharpe the widow stated that her husband had a nervous breakdown while serving at the front and returned to England from France early in the month.  He had been on furlough at home until Monday when he left for London travelling first to Edinburgh.  He was not in his right mind since he returned home and was always holding his hand.  He was a broken-down man and paid no attention to his family although he was an affectionate father and husband.

The coroner read the following letter from the deceased which was found in his pocket - I beg to inform you that I have been done by the colliery doctor.  I am taken by the hand by the red cross which are getting me examined by the profession.  Everyone who is fooled in life by expert fools.

In reply to the coroner the witness added that her husband ought to have left home on Thursday the 22nd inst but was too ill to travel.

Detective Sergeant Bateman of the Great Northern Railway Company's Police stated that on the arrival of the 11.10pm train at Kings Cross from Edinburgh on Monday his attention was directed to a third-class carriage where he saw the deceased lying on his left side in the corridor.  There were wounds in his throat but the bleeding had stopped.  Seeing that he was alive the winess roused him and asked him what he had done it for to which the deceased replied - I have been drove to it by the military authorities.  When asked whar he had inflicted the injury with he answered a razor.  A razor was subsequently found in his pocket.  The deceased was removed to the Royal Free Hospitral.

Dr Austin Williams of the hospital stated that the deceased expired a couple of hours after his admission.  The post-mortem examination showed that there were 6 wounds in the left side of the neck and 4 on the right and the external jugular vein was severed.  Death was due to shock and exhaustion consequent on self-inflicted injuries.




[I'm not going to comment too much on this as it is self-explanatory and extremely tragic.  However I would suggest the cause of death was obviously actually whatever he had experienced at the front line and I am surprised that the coroner didn't call any of his military superiors to find out what he had experienced that led to his breakdown].

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 14 August 2015

2 deaths, rainfall and unusual animals .......



In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend
 
(Unfortunately the Saturday August 14 and 21 1915 issues have not survived so I will stick to the Saturday August 7 1915 issue for 2 more weeks):


Sudden death after a holiday

Mrs Marshall, wife of Mr Fred Marshall, New Row died suddenly after spending a holiday in Callendar.  When nearing her home she collapsed in the street and died shortly afterwards.  Death was due to heart failure.  She was 74 years of age.

Rainfall

The rainfall for July was above an average.  Rain fell on twenty-nine days and the heaviest fall was on the 7th when 0.75 inches was registered.  The total rainfall for the month was 4.37 inches as compared to 4.20 inches in July last year.

[n the central belt of Scotland, where I live, we have certainly felt robbed of our Summer this year as we have had very few warm days and a lot of rain.  This is why the above article got my attention!  In July 2015 Scotland's rainfall has been 128mm which converts to 5.04 inches.  Therefore this proves decisivly (!) that Scotland is getting wetter].

Man killed at Rosyth

John Wilson, bearer, employed by the Motherwell Bridge Building Company Ltd was killed instantaneously at Rosyth Dockyard on Tuesday.  He tripped and fell off a girder and in his descent of 30 feet he struck another girder and fractured his skull.  He was about 40 years of age and is supposed to belong to Edinburgh.  He only started work with the company on Tuesday.

Bird and animal curiosities in the Glen

People of an observant nature may have noticed that all ? life in Pittencrieff Glen has not followed the laws of natural history.  A cinnamon robin flits about from shrub to shrub evidently proud that his back is lighter than that of its neighbours even though its breast is of the same cherry ?.  An albino sparrow is equally proud of its anaemic plumage and finds delight in displaying its feathered pallor in front of those who sip tea in the team-rooms.  These are not the the only freaks that nature has endowed on the Glen.  A cat belonging to the policies has defied convention in regard to its coat.  It is neither blotched not striped nor plain, its skin is composed of white and black hairs equally mixed.

[Pittencrieff Park or the Glen as it is also known was gifted by Andrew Carnegie to the people of Dunfermline in 1902.  It is a fabulous, huge park and still has plenty of birds and grey squirrels to be spotted within its grounds.  The Glen also has peacocks - Clive, Louise and Henrietta.  The Glen has had some recent additions which is why this article got my attention - a peahen and some baby peacocks:



]

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 7 August 2015

Appearances at the City Police Court


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the Saturday August 7 1915 issue):

City Police Court

[The City Police Court was based in the Guildhall building on Dunfermline's High Street where Wetherspoons is now]

Monday

(Before Baillie Norval)

[Norval Place in Rosyth is named after Baillie Norval.  Baillie/Police Judge James Norval was on the committee for naming streets in Rosyth and later became Provost of Dunfermline]

Of the 15 persons who were in the hands of the City Police at the weekend only 4 appeared.

Drunks



Agnes Brown outdoor worker of no fixed address admitted having been found helplessly drunk in Bruce Street on Saturday.  She said she had a son a private and had got very bad news of him. She was fined 2s 5d with the option of 5 days imprisonment.

Alexander Dunbar a labourer who had been found in like condition in Queen Anne Street on Saturday evening was similarly punished, the magistrate remarking that at a time like the present young fellows should not take drink until helpless.

 Peace breakers

Rodger Docherty and John Burnett labourers admitted having made a disturbance in Dunfermline Model Lodging House on Saturday night.  They said they had no recollection of the occurrence.  They were each fined 15s with the option of 7 days imprisonment.

[For those who are know Dunfermline, the building which was Dunfermline Model Lodging House still stands - it's the building on the corner of Chapel Street, Carnegie Drive and Bruce Street which has a hairdresser, take-away and tattoo parlour on the ground floor.  It was built in 1900 as a model lodging house, taken over by the YMCA who ran it as a hostel for servicemen until it was converted into shops in 1958]

Tuesday

(Before Baillie Norval)

Kirkgate Drunk

Annie Smith vagrant was fined 15s with the option of going to prison for 10 days for being drunk on 2nd inst in Kirkgate.

Neighbours Quarrel - Conflicting Evidence

Jane Cowan or Grant wife of John Grant labourer, 4 Orchardhead Hut, Rosyth and Eliza Fernie or Hannah, 34 Mortimer Street, Dundee denied a charge of having assaulted Mrs Mary Baxter of French wife of Albert French No 3 Orchardhead Hut by striking her with their fists and causing a disturbance.  Accused was defended by Mr Peter McLeod  Evidence was led to the effect that the women who were neighbours quarrelled concerning the ownership of several articles. Mrs Grant gripped Mrs French and they had to be separated.  Mrs Hannah was a stranger on holiday.  Baillie Norval said it was evidently a squabble between neighbours regarding a clock and a fender.  In view of the conflicting nature of the evidence he found the charge not proven.

James McGuire admitted being drunk on 4th inst in Bruce Street and was admonished.


Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.





Friday, 31 July 2015

News from the villages ................


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the Saturday July 31 1915 issue):
 
This week I'm highlighting snippets of news from several of the small villages in west Fife:
 
Crossgates

Several cases of fever have been lately reported and the outcry against the insanitary conditions of the burn running through the village has again been raised.

Donibristle

The mission sabbath school children had their picnic to Aberdour on Saturday.  Unfortunately the weather proved unfavourable.  Better fortune attended the teachers who had their drive on Wednesday to Leven when the weather was dry and delightful.

Limekilns and Charlestown

A somewhat alarming train crash occurred at Charlestown Station near Dunfermline on Monday.  A goods train was approaching the station down a steep incline when the brakes failed to hold and the engine dashed into the permanent buffers at the east end of the station.   The engine and eight wagons were derailed whilst several of the wagons were smashed.  The driver and fireman of train jumped clear.  The contents of the wagons included live shells and it is a miracle that an explosion did not occur.  The passenger traffic had to be diverted on Monday to the goods station.




Crombie and Charlestown

In Dunfermline Sheriff Court on Monday proof was to have been led in an action for compensation at the instance of Mrs Isabella Addison or Readie widow and Catherine Finlayson spinster Stable Row, Charlestown against Messrs C R Taylor and company, electrical engineers, Crombie Explosive Works.  Pursuers are the mother and stepsister respectively of Charles Readie labourer who was killed by an overhead crane falling on him last December.  Pursuers claimed the sum of £195 representing 3 years earnings and have accepted the sum of £100 with modified expenses.

[Crombie Munition Works as it was latterly known only closed a few years ago]

Torryburn

Sheriff Umpherston heard evidence in Dunfermline Sheriff Court on Wednesday in a poaching prosecution at the instance of Dr Nasmyth.  The accused party was Alexander Kirkwood miner Main Street Torryburn and it was alleged against him that in a field known as Meadow Park on Torrie estate he trespassed in pursuit of game and killed a rabbit. Mr A P Macbain solicitor prosecuted and the accused who tendered a plea of not guilty was defended by Mr P McLeod.  The defence was that the accused had a permit from the tenant of the field and the point in law was whether the tenant was such a tenant under the Ground Game Act of 1881 as to entitle him to issue a permit to kill rabbits.  No evidence was produced showing the nature of the tenant's holding and the Sheriff adjourned the case until Monday in order that such evidence might be forthcoming.

Saline

Mr James Bennett son of Mr D Bennett merchant has been successful in passing the examination held in London recently for the Associateship of the Royal Institute of British Architects.  Mr Bennett acquired his early professional training in the office of Mr Houston, Dunfermline and is at present engaged in Glasgow with Sir John Burnett.


Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.




 

Friday, 24 July 2015

A mysterious burglary and an obituary


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the Saturday July 24 1915 issue):

A mysterious burglary

A burglary of a mysterious character has been perpetrated at the garage in Comely Park Place occupied by Rev I O Critchley.  Mr Critchley is at present on active service as chaplain at the Dardanelles.  Mrs Critchley had been away from home for several weeks and on her return had occasion to visit the garage which is situated beside several buildings for a similar purpose along a lane a considerable distance from the house.  She was astonished to find that the door had been burst open.  Further investigation disclosed that the car showed unmistakable signs of having been used.  In fact it was slightly damaged and a quantity of petrol had vanished.  The mileage instrument also proved that the car had travelled a good distance.  The police are interesting themselves in the matter.



Obituary

Many Dunfermline residents interested in social reform and religious work feel the city has been made much poorer by the death of Miss Mary Ferguson, Maitland Street.  Miss Ferguson had reached the age of 80 years but advancing years did not weaken her sympathies with or restrain her activities in behalf of good causes. Her rule of life was service for the benefit of others.  The varied benevolent work she carried out was always performed with a cheerfulness of spirit that put doubt or despair to shame.  Not a few of the most devoted and most efficient members of the British Women's Temperance Association owe their inspiration to the example and character of Miss Ferguson.

This week's genealogy challenge

Can you find out anything about either Rev I O Critchley or Miss Ferguson?  Please leave a comment or e-mail me ..........

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 17 July 2015

Children's Gala and the Police Court

In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the Saturday July 17 1915 issue):
This week I've highlighted another name-rich resource I've found (see afterwards for an expanation if you're not familar with the concept of a 'gala') and also, for those who like to read about criminals ( otherwise known as the after-effects of the weekend's revelry), a police court report.
Children's Gala, Kelty
The annual gala was held on Saturday in the public park where all the children of school age met numbering over 1000.  They were formed into sections with with the co-operation of the teaching staff and a large committee they were provided with a substantial refreshment and a gift of 3d each after which a large number of races and other entertainments were entered into.  The football competitions were all keenly contested for which handsome prizes were offered there being an entry of 35 teams for the three sections.  There were also a number of special races for boys and girls over 12 years of age.  The following are the principal prize-winners:- 100 yards race - 1 T Henderson, 2 Hy Henderson, 3 John Cuthbert 220 yards race - 1 Henderson, 2 Hutchison, 3 J A Morrison.  Half mile race 1 Henderson, 2 Hutchison, 3 Wm Brown.  High jump - 1 A Cowan 3 ft 10 in, 2 Henderson 3ft 9 in, 3 J Anderson 3 ft 8 in.  Broad jump - 1 Henderson 12 ft 5 in, 2 Hutchison 12ft 3 in, 3 Anderson 12 ft.  Hop, step and leap - 1 Henderson 30ft 4 in, 2 Cowan 29 ft 2 in, 3 Hutchison 29 ft 1 1/2 in.  100 yards girls' race - 1 Mary Patrick, 2 Lizzie Adams, 3 Marie Hailstones.  50 yards girls' race - 1 A Cameron, 2 G Wilson, 3 A Pane.  100 yards boys' race (under 12 years) - 1 Bertie Galloway, 2 A Anderson, 3 T Adams.  All the winners were presented with suitable prizes while in addition to this T Henderson was presented with a gold medal for having gained most points in each of the events while H Hutchison received a silver medal as runner up.  The Kelty and Blairadam Brass Band were present during the afternoon and discoursed a programme of music while Mr Jospeh King's Troupe of  dancers gave an exhibition of Highland dancing.  A squad of the St Andrews Red Cross Ambulance were present in order to render assistance if called upon.  The weather was fine but general regret was expressed that the procession was not held as in former years.  Thanks are due to Mr Rattray the chairman and others for the way in which the whole arrangements were carried through.
[A gala is a week long celebration still very popular in West Fife which tends to be hald in June or July in both towns and villages.  It tends to consist, nowdays, of various events each evening during the week such as barbecues, pet shows and dances, then on the Saturday children are chosen as the Royal party for the day, there will be a parade of floats ie decorated lorries and also people on foot and then an afternoon of races and displays.  I recently watched a video from 1932 of the Dunfermline Children's Gala and it was very similar to what happens nowadays: http://ssa.nls.uk/film/1360 ]
Inverkeithing Police Court
On Monday the following cases were disposed of before Baillie Wylie - Bernard Burns and Patrick O'Donnell were both charged with being drunk and disorderly and in each case a fine of 15s was imposed with the option of 10 days imprisonment.  Thomas Callum for being drunk and incapable was fined 5s or 5 days.  Robert Bryce was fined 2s 6d or 5 days for committing an obstruction.  For cimmitting a breach of the peace Patrick Ferry was fined 10s or ten days.  On Tuesday Peter McGovern was sentenced a to a fine of 10s or 10 days for breach of the peace.
Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........

Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 10 July 2015

Sunday School Prize Giving


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the Saturday July 10 1915 issue):

I've noticed since I started this blog that there are lots of name rich articles in the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser from 100 years ago.  If you are researching a family from Dunfermline you would be able to find out amazing details about their lives especially if their name is relatively unusual and you can work out the time period they would have been attending school, which area they lived in etc etc.

This week I am being slightly self-indulgent!  I'm a Sunday School teacher and last Sunday my church held the annual book presentations for the children who attend Sunday School.  I've found a Sunday School prize-giving list from 100 years ago for comparison:

Inverkeithing - Special Children's Service

A special service for the Sabbath School children was held in the UF church, Inverkeithing on Sunday evening when the children were presented with prizes for the session just ended.  The Rev Mr Bryce who conducted the service addressed the children and distributed the prizes as follows:

For regular attendance during the session: Colin Morris, Edward M'Queen, James Morris, Charles Barr, Alexander Taylor, Andrew Dalziel, John Ferguson, David Armit, Gavin Henderson, John Morris, James Horsburgh, Bertie Telford, Robert Robertson and James Cherrie; Mary Robertson, Mary Dalziel, Jan Ferguson, Lizzie Armit, Bethia Armit, Lizzie Robertson, Maggie M'Queen, Cathie Cousin, Missy (?) Mynard, Robina Armit, Maggie Marshall, Hannah Morris, Betty Horsburgh, May Telford, Lizzie M'Queen, Jessie Cousin, Cissie (?) Armit, Annie Blake, May M'Creary, Barbara McGregor.

Annie Blake and May M'Creary who had attended the Sabbath School for seven and six years respectively with perfect regularity were awarded special prizes.

The following scholars gained certificates at the Sabbath School examination: Senior section Ella Carr 1st; Dorothy Hay 1st.  Middle section Cisey Armitt 1st; Mary Donnelly 1st; Ella Horsburgh 1st; Chrissie Carr 1st; Betty Bryan 1st; Andrew Hay 1st; John Morris 1st; James Horsburgh 1st; Mary Stoddart 2nd.



This week's family history challenge is can you find anything out about any of these children?  My personal thought would be to choose perhaps a family with an unusual surname, find them in the 1911 census and then do a little digging backwards ..............

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........
Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 3 July 2015

School prizes and a DCM for a Dunfermline man

In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the Saturday July 3 1915 issue):

School prizes

Crossford school:

A programme of part songs, solos and recitations were carried out with great spirit to the evident satisfaction of all.  Colonel Hunt, Logie and Mrs and Miss Drysdale, representing an old scholar, were the donors of the beautiful book prizes as well as special prizes for sewing and knitting.  There were present also Mrs Macdonald, member of the school board, and Mr Morgan, local manager - the latter of whom has taken an interest in the school for the past 70 years or so.  After the distribution of prizes by Colonel Hunt for regular attendance and by Miss Drysdale for Bible, writing and sewing, the gentlemen present addressed the children on their privileges and responsibilities.  The present war times gave a tone to all the remarks Mr MacDonald specially addressed the pupils who are leaving at this time and in closing proposed votes of thanks to the Colonel and Mrs Drysdale for their renewed kindness in giving the valuable prizes and for their presence with them that day.  The soloists were Magdalene Stephen, P Cumming, N More, Mabel Angus, Minnie Cumming, Dianah Duncan, Edith Gow and James Coutts.  The dux of the school was Lizzie Allan.  It should also be mentioned that our good friend, Mr Inverarity, again contributed to the prize fund.



[Logie House still exists on the edge of the village of Crossford and is a house built in 1870 iwth a twentieth century extension.  The house has a shield dated 1870 above the doorway with a monogram JAH, for James Alexander Hunt, below.  The gardens of Logie House are usually open to the public once a year through the Scotland's Gardens scheme and the house is still in the hands of the Hunt family.]
DCM for Dunfermline RFA man

Mr John Spence, Pittencrieff Street, Dunfermline has received intimation from his son, Bombardier Alexander Spence, 7th Division of the RFA, that he has been awarded the DCM.  Bombardier Spence is unable to say the incident which brought him the honour, but he is inclined to believe that it was for an act prior to the battle of Neuve Chapelle.  A fierce bombardment was in progress between the British and German lines.  Bombardier Spence was in a house undertaking signalling duty.  The signalling wires were cut by a shell no fewer than five times.  On four occasions Spence went out under heavy fire and executed the work of repair, on the fifth occasion his efforts were frustrated in consequence of the lack of material to restore the damage.

Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........
Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.

Friday, 26 June 2015

A supposed cure all and the benefits of wearing an H Samuel watch at Ypres


In the Dunfermline Journal and Advertiser for West Fife 100 years ago this weekend (to be specific the Saturday June 26 1915 issue):
 
 
A supposed cure all
 
"For the blood is the life"
Do you suffer from any skin or blood disease such as eczema, scrofula, bad legs, abscesses, ulcers, glandular swellings, boils, pimples, sores of any kind, piles, blood poison, rheumatism, gout etc?  If so don't waste your time and money on lotions and ointments which cannot get below the surface of the skin.  What you want and what you must have is a medicine that will thoroughly free the blood of the poisonous matter which alone is the true cause of all your suffering.  Clarke's Blood Mixture is just such  a medicine.  It is composed of ingredients which quickly expel from the blood all impurities from whatever cause arising and by rendering it clean and pure can be relied on to inflict a lasting cure.
Over 50 years' success.  Pleasant to the taste.
Clarke's Blood Mixture.
Has cured thousand will cure you.
Sold by all chemists and stores, ?/? per bottle.
 
[This struck a personal note with me.  My great-grandmother died very prematurely in 1917 days after giving birth to my great-aunt due to my great-grandmother's exhaustion and general ill-health and many years later we found very similar ads cut out from newspapers in her personal effects.  It is sad to think that 100 years ago people who could not pay for doctors relied on such 'medicines'.]
 
The benefits of wearing an H Samuel watch at Ypres
 
Smashed by a German shell!
Miss K Stovell, 148 New Street, Hersham writes of an H Samuel watch worn by her brother Corporal Stovell, RFA:-
"When near Ypres it was struck by a German shell and battered in but even that did not stop it for it still goes though undoubtedly it saved him from a severe wound."
That is the kind of quality you find in all H Samuel's watches - remarkable strength.
H Samuel watchmaker to the admiralty, 40 North Bridge and 25 Princes Street, Edinburgh.
Luminous wrist watch and compass.  As illustrated.  Invaluable to the men at the front.  Shows true time and direction instantly by night or day.  15 jewels, lever movement, handsome night case, strong strap, 30/-, other luminous watches from ?/?.
 
 
 
 
Now, here's a challenge for my genealogist readers.  Is there any chance the testimonial is genuine, can you find any trace of Miss K Sovell and her corporal brother?
Tune in next week to see what happened in Dunfermline next week 100 years ago ..........
Blog written by Jacqueline Hunter of Ancestral Research by Jacqueline, Dunfermline, Scotland. Please email me at jacquelinehunter895@gmail.com if I can help you with your family history research.